“While it’s good to be green, it’s a plus when we craft something beautiful at the same time. The depth of color, patina and richness of salvaged materials are also design factors that can make our homes truly wonderful.
From the brick walls to the slate roof and more, Mark Hickman used quite a bit of salvaged material in the construction of Hidden Manor, a new home in the Chicago suburbs. These salvaged materials give the home much of its “always been there” quality, and they’re coupled with new, energy-efficient glass windows and doors.
One of the nice aspects of reusing a salvaged material like Chicago brick is how each piece takes on its own personality. It’s as if each individual brick were carefully hand made by an artisan.
Salvaged materials aren’t just for the exterior. In the case of Hidden Manor, the salvaged Chicago brick was brought inside. And what’s the point of using brick and stone if you can’t express their solidity and massiveness? A simple splaying of the window’s rough opening does just that.
In addition to the structural materials of brick and stone, salvaged materials have been used for the interiors. For example, reclaimed boards were milled anew for the kitchen cabinets, creating a truly unique kitchen.
modern living room by Narofsky Architecture + ways2design

Architect Stuart Narofsky really enjoys incorporating salvaged lumber into his designs. His use of these reclaimed materials adds warmth to many of his modern designs. And Narofsky likes these materials left exposed, saving on the expense of paint and drywall.
For loft renovations, Narofsky will salvage lumber from nearby to incorporate in the finishes. Paneled walls and barn doors made of these materials will have the same appearance as the loft’s original wood framing while keeping the relocated material from a landfill.
Using salvaged doors, sinks, tubs and light fixtures is a great way to add character and style to your project while being greener, too. Salvage yards in just about every city provide almost every building component, from hardware to garden ornaments.
by CoorItalia

Builders and architects aren’t alone in their desire to salvage materials. Many companies that make new materials, such as clay roof tiles, also specialize in salvaging and making available for reuse existing materials. These companies have a respect for the inherent beauty and quality of these materials. Keeping them out of our landfills is a good thing.”

Tomorrow I will share  how we have enjoyed incorporating salvage into our own new construction projects to make some pretty special buildings. In the meantime,

if you would like to be able to say, “That was fun!” at the end of your project contact me at

www.cindybarganier.com. 

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